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6:55
One of the most exciting and innovative programs in the sport aviation industry is an interesting little program that attempts to defeat the many common issues that prevent today's kit aircraft builder from completing the complex task of completing a kit-built SportPlane. Called "Two Weeks To Taxi," the folks at Glasair Aviation have looked at all the factors that keep airplanes from being built and built a packaged solution that not only virtually guarantees a completion, but does so in near record time. "Two Weeks to Taxi was created because a high percentage of the over 1000 kits sold each year are not completed by the original buyer. We wanted to know what the industry could do to change that," Glasair Aviation President Mikael Via reports. "We determined that buyers often have a false sense of the time and expense involved with building an airplane. They know the cost of the kit, engine, and avionics. What they don't realize is the cost of induction and exhaust systems, spinner, brakes, windows, interior, light, and all of the other little things that drive the cost up." "They also misjudge the cost of equipping a workshop and/or hangar," added Via. "They also don't consider the amount of time to set up a shop, building jigs, cleaning up and setting up for the next piece to assemble." Initially developed for Glasair's Sportsman 2+2 model, Two Weeks to Taxi is designed to present an organized work area where all parts and tools are at the builder's fingertips, and expert assistance is available to help the builder. By eliminating delays associated with missing parts or hardware and removing the uncertainty of "Am I doing this right?", TWTT believes they can save from 70 to 90 percent of the time lost to these delays. The better part of 1000 Sportsmen have been built under the program. They spun Two Weeks to Taxi off into a separate company, and will add additional models as market demand dictates, and TWTT is able to handle the workload. Another consideration is keeping in compliance with the 51% Rule, because that limits how much contribution TWTT will be able to make. In some cases, they may actually have to un-do work on some parts of a kit, if they determine a need to incorporate a difficult procedure for a different piece into the program. The builder would then reassemble the disassembled component, as to keep with the spirit of the 51% rule. Other possibilities are to pre-fit some parts, so they fit together better than when the kit left the factory. Via emphasized that the program isn't for everyone. By the nature of the process, some flexibility is sacrificed concerning options available to the builder. He also emphasized that the airframe is not complete at the end of the program, but is well on its way to completion. Pricing for the Two Weeks to Taxi program varies, depending on airframe, engine, avionic and other options. FMI: www.twoweekstotaxi****, www.glasairaviation**** Copyright 2008, Aero-News Network, Inc., ALL Rights Reserved.
7 Apr 2008
485
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5:08
One of the most exciting and innovative programs in the sport aviation industry is an interesting little program that attempts to defeat the many common issues that prevent today's kit aircraft builder from completing the complex task of completing a kit-built SportPlane. Called "Two Weeks To Taxi," the folks at Glasair Aviation have looked at all the factors that keep airplanes from being built and built a packaged solution that not only virtually guarantees a completion, but does so in near record time. "Two Weeks to Taxi was created because a high percentage of the over 1000 kits sold each year are not completed by the original buyer. We wanted to know what the industry could do to change that," Glasair Aviation President Mikael Via reports. "We determined that buyers often have a false sense of the time and expense involved with building an airplane. They know the cost of the kit, engine, and avionics. What they don't realize is the cost of induction and exhaust systems, spinner, brakes, windows, interior, light, and all of the other little things that drive the cost up." "They also misjudge the cost of equipping a workshop and/or hangar," added Via. "They also don't consider the amount of time to set up a shop, building jigs, cleaning up and setting up for the next piece to assemble." Initially developed for Glasair's Sportsman 2+2 model, Two Weeks to Taxi is designed to present an organized work area where all parts and tools are at the builder's fingertips, and expert assistance is available to help the builder. By eliminating delays associated with missing parts or hardware and removing the uncertainty of "Am I doing this right?", TWTT believes they can save from 70 to 90 percent of the time lost to these delays. The better part of 1000 Sportsmen have been built under the program. They spun Two Weeks to Taxi off into a separate company, and will add additional models as market demand dictates, and TWTT is able to handle the workload. Another consideration is keeping in compliance with the 51% Rule, because that limits how much contribution TWTT will be able to make. In some cases, they may actually have to un-do work on some parts of a kit, if they determine a need to incorporate a difficult procedure for a different piece into the program. The builder would then reassemble the disassembled component, as to keep with the spirit of the 51% rule. Other possibilities are to pre-fit some parts, so they fit together better than when the kit left the factory. Via emphasized that the program isn't for everyone. By the nature of the process, some flexibility is sacrificed concerning options available to the builder. He also emphasized that the airframe is not complete at the end of the program, but is well on its way to completion. Pricing for the Two Weeks to Taxi program varies, depending on airframe, engine, avionic and other options. FMI: www.twoweekstotaxi****, www.glasairaviation**** Copyright 2008 Aero-News Network, Inc., ALL Rights Reserved.
8 Apr 2008
723
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7:21
One of the most exciting and innovative programs in the sport aviation industry is an interesting little program that attempts to defeat the many common issues that prevent today's kit aircraft builder from completing the complex task of completing a kit-built SportPlane. Called "Two Weeks To Taxi," the folks at Glasair Aviation have looked at all the factors that keep airplanes from being built and built a packaged solution that not only virtually guarantees a completion, but does so in near record time. "Two Weeks to Taxi was created because a high percentage of the over 1000 kits sold each year are not completed by the original buyer. We wanted to know what the industry could do to change that," Glasair Aviation President Mikael Via reports. "We determined that buyers often have a false sense of the time and expense involved with building an airplane. They know the cost of the kit, engine, and avionics. What they don't realize is the cost of induction and exhaust systems, spinner, brakes, windows, interior, light, and all of the other little things that drive the cost up." "They also misjudge the cost of equipping a workshop and/or hangar," added Via. "They also don't consider the amount of time to set up a shop, building jigs, cleaning up and setting up for the next piece to assemble." Initially developed for Glasair's Sportsman 2+2 model, Two Weeks to Taxi is designed to present an organized work area where all parts and tools are at the builder's fingertips, and expert assistance is available to help the builder. By eliminating delays associated with missing parts or hardware and removing the uncertainty of "Am I doing this right?", TWTT believes they can save from 70 to 90 percent of the time lost to these delays. The better part of 1000 Sportsmen have been built under the program. They spun Two Weeks to Taxi off into a separate company, and will add additional models as market demand dictates, and TWTT is able to handle the workload. Another consideration is keeping in compliance with the 51% Rule, because that limits how much contribution TWTT will be able to make. In some cases, they may actually have to un-do work on some parts of a kit, if they determine a need to incorporate a difficult procedure for a different piece into the program. The builder would then reassemble the disassembled component, as to keep with the spirit of the 51% rule. Other possibilities are to pre-fit some parts, so they fit together better than when the kit left the factory. Via emphasized that the program isn't for everyone. By the nature of the process, some flexibility is sacrificed concerning options available to the builder. He also emphasized that the airframe is not complete at the end of the program, but is well on its way to completion. Pricing for the Two Weeks to Taxi program varies, depending on airframe, engine, avionic and other options. FMI: www.twoweekstotaxi****, www.glasairaviation**** Copyright 2008, Aero-News Network, Inc., ALL Rights Reserved.
9 Apr 2008
240
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7:28
Aero-TV: US Sport Aviation Expo's Robert Woods Talks LSA (Part One) The 4th Annual Sebring FL-based US Sport Aviation Expo is now history. The growing (occasionally struggling) LSA movement shows signs that it may mature into a solid industry, providing a new entry-level option for those who want to become pilots and aircraft owners. While there are still too many manufacturers barely keeping the doors open, the entry of industry heavyweights Cirrus design and Cessna Aircraft was a signal to one and all that the LSA market had to be taken seriously. Among the more significant news we heard from the 2008 USSAE, was Cirrus Design's decision to start taking orders for their speedy little SRS, the naming of US SkyCatcher completion centers by Cessna, the unveiling of the new Flight Design CTLS, the introduction of the TECNAM P92 Eaglet, the unveiling of the Gobosh 800XP, the chance to look over the updated Indus Aviation Thorpedo, new options form American legend, a chance to look over the Teledyne Continental O-200D (the engine that will power the SkyCatcher), as well as the opportunity to catch up on all things Rotax, AirCam, X-Air, Evektor, and so much more. in other words, despite the rain, the cold and the wind; there was no lack of things to see and do in Sebring, FL. Still; there was the specter of trouble ahead... as most of the better offerings at the USSAE cost well over 100K... and we;'re not sure that their is a sustainable market for aircraft in that price range. Much has been written about the need to bring "new blood" into the aviation business... how we need new pilots and a way to provide ready access to the freedom of the skies for tall those who have dreamed of playing among the clouds. We desperately need a cost-effective path for people to follow to stretch their wings... but to be honest, we're not sure that 100-130K LSAs are the ticket we've been looking for. BUT... there was NO mistaking the excitement of so many people we met at Sebring... people who see LSA as THE answer to their search for wings... and see this new market as a proper way for them to enter the world of flight... We hope that their interest is a sustained phenomenon. For an overview of this year's event, we spent some time with USSAE Event Chairman Robert Wood, who has been watching this industry as closely as anyone, for his thoughts and feelings on the state of the art and the state of the market for Light Sport Aircraft... Without further delay, let's check out Aero-TV's interview with USSAE Chairman Robert Woods. FMI: www.sport-aviation-expo****/organization.htm
3 Feb 2008
1132
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4:45
Cessna has an LSA... and so (now) does Cirrus... BUT what does the master homebuilder of homebuilders have up his sleeve with the RV12? FMI: www.vansaircraft**** Copyright, Aero-News Network, Inc., ALL Rights Reserved.
17 Mar 2008
1897
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6:57
Light, Quiet and Sophisticated: Aero-TV Checks Out The Clarity Aloft Headset How Come Something This Light and Small Work So Well??? For the last few weeks, you may have read us extolling the virtues of a headset that was the target of our first-ever News-Spy Award program... the TSO'd Clarity Aloft headset by Aloft Technologies. This didn't happen by accident... we were so impressed by eh diminutive dimensions and the outstanding performance that it seemed like a worthwhile award -- and it was -- just ask Sandi Shoffner, who won the first of our News-Spy contributor awards and is enjoying her new headset as we write this! The newest TSO'd product by Aloft Technologies, the "Pro" version of the Clarity Aloft headset does what we thought wasn't going to be all that easy to do... improve on a great product. Redesigned and fully TSO approved, this headset combines the technical superiority of the original with even lighter materials (and how they do that without pumping it full of helium, we do not know... grin) and ergonomic design. To get right to the point, folks, this thing weighs an ounce and a half... and nothing that light (outside of a Florida borne mosquito) can possibly be all that uncomfortable. As a matter of fact, the thing we like best about these headsets is that once they're on, you really do forget they're there... which can make for an interesting exit if you don't think to remove when exiting your aircraft. Grin. The secret to the noise attenuation properties of the headset is their employment of patented Comply Canal Tips, composed of soft viscoelastic foam, the same foam tips used in advanced hearing aids. More than simple earplugs, these foam tips provide full spectrum noise reduction: 35-45dB of attenuation. This advanced technology has been lab tested to prove that viscoelastic passive noise reduction (VPNR) is superior to active noise reduction (ANR), especially in the speech frequencies, precisely where clarity of sound and hearing protection is most needed for aviation communications. The noise-canceling microphone used in the Clarity Aloft Headset is a high fidelity noise canceling Electret Condenser microphone with performance optimized for speech frequencies in extremely high noise environments. Stage performers and musicians use this same microphone because they must insist on the highest level of sound reproduction. All in all, it's a light, useful, QUIET, comfortable, affordable and highly wearable headset... one of the best we've ever tried... but enough of the narrative... check out the Aero-TV product feature for yourself! FMI: www.clarityaloft****
23 Feb 2008
1636
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6:18
Some Intriguing Details Prove That CD's LSA Is More Than A "SkyCatcher-Catcher" (Part 2 of 3) With all the attention (good and bad) being paid to the aggressive position taken by Cessna in bringing an LSA to market, it seemed that it was time to catch up with Cirrus Design's LSA program... we started Part One with an overview of the original announcement at Oshkosh 2007 and are pleased to update you with the latest info as of the 2008 Sebring Sport Aviation Expo (in this episode, Part Two -- and the next, Part Three), recently concluded in central Florida. The Cirrus Design SRS is based on the European Fk Polaris, which was lighter, faster, and not in alignment with the FAA's LSA specs - prior to its "Cirrus-ization." Once that process is complete, it will max out the LSA standards -- which will give the CD engineering team the unusual task of slowing down the lightning quick European version. Manufacturer Fk Lightplanes has a 17-year history in light plane manufacturing. With operations in Poland, the Klapmeiers foresee the manufacture of their plane remaining in Poland, with assembly in the US -- a model followed by other vendors of foreign-sourced planes. For the past four years, Cirrus evaluated two-seat planes from European manufacturers -- the center of development for this type of aircraft. "The relationship we have developed with Fk Lightplanes allows us to rapidly offer cost efficient, sporty, entry-level aircraft for sport and recreation enthusiasts and basic training," said Klapmeier. "And our worldwide service and support infrastructure will make the SRS even more appealing." FMI:www.cirrusdesign**** Copyright 2008, Aero-News Network, ALL Rights Reserved.
14 Feb 2008
3295
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5:32
Aero-TV: Mike Sigman Talks About His Personal LSA -- A Zodiac 601XL The cheerful troops that populate Aero-TV news teams sure do enjoy checking out all manner of neat aircraft with the companies that manufacture them, but sometimes it's just plain fun to talk to the folks who (ultimately) build and fly them... personally. Mike Sigman is just one of those folks. A builder of a Zodiac 601XL, we caught up with Mike at Arlington's Northwest EAA Fly-In last summer and chatted with him about his personal choice for an LSA... how it went together during the building process, and now that he was finished -- how he liked it all. Mike told us he was looking for a cross-country aircraft that was good on fuel, dependable and reasonably priced. He wanted to build 'all-metal,' but he did NOT want to buck rivets (the Zodiac uses the Avex 'pop' riveting system), and finally, he wanted a Jabiru engine for the front end... and thereupon decided upon the Zodiac. The ZODIAC XL is a completely new model of the ZODIAC kit aircraft series, optimized for the proposed Sport Pilot category. The ZODIAC XL features a completely new wing design, landing gear and fuselage. The tail sections are the only components common with all ZODIAC models. Fort those who are more interested in flying than building, but STILL want the opportunity to get to know their bird "inside and out," Zenith can supply a Quick-Build Kit (supplied "firewall-back" to allow for easy installation of your choice of engine -- whether it be Jabiru 3300, Continental O-200, Rotax 912S, Corvair, or others). The kit includes all airframe parts, including landing gear (tricycle), standard fuel system, canopy, controls, and all hardware required to finish the airframe assembly. Standard features of the airframe kit include electric elevator trim tab, extended rear baggage compartment, wheels with hydraulic disk brakes, and more. Not included in the airframe kit: powerplant, instruments package, and paint. The Quick-Build Kit includes the larger wing tanks (15 US gal. each) for added range and endurance. Check In With Aero-TV To See If Mike Sigman Thinks He Made A Good Choice With The Zodiac 601XL... FMI: www.zenithair**** Copyright 2008, Aero-News Network, Inc., ALL Rights Reserved
29 Feb 2008
1138
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5:15
A few weeks ago, Aero-TV traveled to Champaign, Illinois, to sample the delights of an all indoor radio-controlled model aircraft event known as E-Fest. It was quite the weekend and we, admittedly, had a great time seeing the best in small model aircraft. While many of the aircraft thrilled us to no end, it was the wild and seemingly non-aerodynamic antics of the RC helicopters that really got our attention. How they work, what you can do with them, and how you can get one for yourself, is the subject of this two part episode of Aero-TV. RC Helicopters were once given a tough rep... being billed as incredibly hard to fly, overtly expensive and endlessly complex. All that has changed - radically. In just the last few years, RC Helis, especially the electric versions, have come down aggressively in price, are available in just about EVERY RC hobby shop, and have become far more easy to fly. This has happened, in large part, due to better design, enhanced stability (and some devices that help them achieve this), and have quite simply become one of the fastest growing segments in model aviation. During the 2008 E-Fest, Aero-TV got the chance to look inside and outside a number of exciting new RV helo models to gain some insight into just how enticing and exciting these aircraft have become. Come Join Aero-TV As We Hover Along With The latest Generation of RC Helicopters. FMI: www.hobbico**** Copyright 2008, Aero-News Network, Inc. ALL Rights Reserved.
23 Apr 2008
2386
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6:38
A few weeks ago, Aero-TV traveled to Champaign, Illinois, to sample the delights of an all indoor radio-controlled model aircraft event known as E-Fest. It was quite the weekend and we, admittedly, had a great time seeing the best in small model aircraft. While many of the aircraft thrilled us to no end, it was the wild and seemingly non-aerodynamic antics of the RC helicopters that really got our attention. How they work, what you can do with them, and how you can get one for yourself, is the subject of this two part episode of Aero-TV. RC Helicopters were once given a tough rep... being billed as incredibly hard to fly, overtly expensive and endlessly complex. All that has changed - radically. In just the last few years, RC Helis, especially the electric versions, have come down aggressively in price, are available in just about EVERY RC hobby shop, and have become far more easy to fly. This has happened, in large part, due to better design, enhanced stability (and some devices that help them achieve this), and have quite simply become one of the fastest growing segments in model aviation. During the 2008 E-Fest, Aero-TV got the chance to look inside and outside a number of exciting new RV helo models to gain some insight into just how enticing and exciting these aircraft have become. Come Join Aero-TV As We Hover Along With The latest Generation of RC Helicopters. Copyright 2008, Aero-News Network, Inc. ALL Rights Reserved. FMI: www.hobbico****
18 Jan 2011
3079
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5:48
While we've been enjoying the fruits of the certified EFIS developments that have popped up over the last few years, we are duty-bound to mention that the experimental aircraft industry has been developing these technologies for many years... and flying them for nearly as long. As a matter of fact, a number of certified products started with the experimental industry. Aero-TV spent some amusing moments with Blue Mountain Avionics' boss, Greg Richter, an irrepressible sort of fellow who has spearheaded a phenomenal amount of glass panel development programs for sport aircraft. In addition to being quite an innovator, we must note that its hard to come away from this feature without also noting that he's a bit of a character... this was a wild (and fun) interview -- despite the fact that we had to brave some uncharacteristically cool temps in central Florida on the closing day of the 2008 US Sport Aviation Expo. Greg's first EFIS flew in 1997, and since then, he has driven Blue Mountain to become one of the preeminent suppliers of EFIS, FMCS and Autopilots for homebuilts and light-sport aircraft. Richter tells ANN that his product line boasts, "the fastest AHRS available (at 420 deg/sec, 4x the nearest competitor), the brightest sunlight-readable displays, built-in WAAS GPS, moving map, 3D terrain avoidance, engine monitor and automated nav/com control." Blue Mountain EFIS installations can be seen in any number of sport aircraft... ranging form Van's speedy RVs to L-39s and even experimental rocketplanes. FMI: www.bluemountainavionics**** Copyright 2008, Aero-News Network, Inc., ALL Rights Reserved.
29 Apr 2008
297
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4:28
While we've been enjoying the fruits of the certified EFIS developments that have popped up over the last few years, we are duty-bound to mention that the experimental aircraft industry has been developing these technologies for many years... and flying them for nearly as long. As a matter of fact, a number of certified products started with the experimental industry. Aero-TV spent some amusing moments with Blue Mountain Avionics' boss, Greg Richter, an irrepressible sort of fellow who has spearheaded a phenomenal amount of glass panel development programs for sport aircraft. In addition to being quite an innovator, we must note that its hard to come away from this feature without also noting that he's a bit of a character... this was a wild (and fun) interview -- despite the fact that we had to brave some uncharacteristically cool temps in central Florida on the closing day of the 2008 US Sport Aviation Expo. Greg's first EFIS flew in 1997, and since then, he has driven Blue Mountain to become one of the preeminent suppliers of EFIS, FMCS and Autopilots for homebuilts and light-sport aircraft. Richter tells ANN that his product line boasts, "the fastest AHRS available (at 420 deg/sec, 4x the nearest competitor), the brightest sunlight-readable displays, built-in WAAS GPS, moving map, 3D terrain avoidance, engine monitor and automated nav/com control." Blue Mountain EFIS installations can be seen in any number of sport aircraft... ranging form Van's speedy RVs to L-39s and even experimental rocketplanes. FMI: www.bluemountainavionics**** Copyright 2008, Aero-News Network, Inc., ALL Rights Reserved.
30 Apr 2008
576
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6:36
The first in a five part series this week is also the first half of a forthright conversation with International Council of AirShows President, John Cudahy, --- which will be followed by a series of short interviews, in three parts, in which members of the airshow community answered the same three questions -- concerning safety, value and the ability of the airshow industry to keep up with the times. Produced at the ICAS Convention just before the end of the year, we were pleased to be able to tackle such important subjects as the industry made ready to start another year... but we apologize for some of the lighting, as we were stuck with some bad conditions and had to make the best of it. ICAS tells us that Airshows draw large numbers of demographically attractive spectators - a well-educated, affluent group of men, women and children of all ages. More than 70 percent of the audience at an air show has had some college education. Three quarters report household income of $35,000 or more. The average spectator is just under 39 years of age, but more than 53 percent of spectators are between 30 and 50. Safety has always been a major airshow concern but a series of unrelated accidents, this past year, to too many performers brought the topic to the forefront of discussion at the most recent ICAS get-together. ICAS notes that Airshows offer a consistently and historically safe environment for millions of spectators each year. Since current rules were implemented nearly 50 years ago, there has not been a single spectator fatality at a North American show – an enviable safety record for any business. But... they're not satisfied to leave it that. A 'small working group' of ICAS members recently met in Dallas to begin work on a new Safety Management System for the air show industry that will serve as an important tool in improving air show safety. Using existing safety management systems as models, ICAS members discussed the changes and accommodations needed to effectively adapt the work already done in other segments of the aviation industry to the particular needs and circumstances of the air show community. Conceived as part of the larger ICAS initiative to change the culture of air show safety, the product of this effort is intended to document processes and procedures that our industry can use to manage risk, report incidents and accidents, participate more actively in accident investigations, identify trends, communicate the results of these investigations to members, and reduce the number of accidents in the air show community. So... On To Part One Of Aero-TV's Conversation With ICAS Prez, John Cudahy. FMI: www.icashq**** Copyright 2008, Aero-News Network, Inc., ALL Rights Reserved.
5 May 2008
468
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6:09
It's Airshow Week At Aero-TV! The Second in a five part series this week is also the other half of a forthright conversation with International Council of AirShows President, John Cudahy, --- which will be followed by a series of short interviews, in three parts, in which members of the airshow community answered the same three questions -- concerning safety, value and the ability of the airshow industry to keep up with the times. Produced at the ICAS Convention just before the end of the year, we were pleased to be able to tackle such important subjects as the industry made ready to start another year... but we apologize for some of the lighting, as we were stuck with some bad conditions and had to make the best of it. ICAS tells us that Airshows draw large numbers of demographically attractive spectators - a well-educated, affluent group of men, women and children of all ages. More than 70 percent of the audience at an air show has had some college education. Three quarters report household income of $35,000 or more. The average spectator is just under 39 years of age, but more than 53 percent of spectators are between 30 and 50. Safety has always been a major airshow concern but a series of unrelated accidents, this past year, to too many performers brought the topic to the forefront of discussion at the most recent ICAS get-together. ICAS notes that Airshows offer a consistently and historically safe environment for millions of spectators each year. Since current rules were implemented nearly 50 years ago, there has not been a single spectator fatality at a North American show – an enviable safety record for any business. But... they're not satisfied to leave it that. A 'small working group' of ICAS members recently met in Dallas to begin work on a new Safety Management System for the air show industry that will serve as an important tool in improving air show safety. Using existing safety management systems as models, ICAS members discussed the changes and accommodations needed to effectively adapt the work already done in other segments of the aviation industry to the particular needs and circumstances of the air show community. Conceived as part of the larger ICAS initiative to change the culture of air show safety, the product of this effort is intended to document processes and procedures that our industry can use to manage risk, report incidents and accidents, participate more actively in accident investigations, identify trends, communicate the results of these investigations to members, and reduce the number of accidents in the air show community. So... On To Part One Of Aero-TV's Conversation With ICAS Prez, John Cudahy. FMI: www.icashq**** Copyright 2008, Aero-News Network, Inc., ALL Rights Reserved.
6 May 2008
939
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7:46
It's Airshow Week At Aero-TV! The third in a five part series, this week, starts off a series of interwoven interviews in which we asked about a dozen airshow professionals the same three questions... each of which will become the topic of its own program over the next three days. In this installment we asked a number of airshow luminaries the following question... after the airshow business was rocked by the loss of a favored team's sponsorship (the Red Barons), do airshows provide the kind of value necessary to keep attracting high level sponsorship??? In the next two parts, we'll address the airshow industry's ability to keep up with the times and the overall safety situation we find ourselves in as 2008 gets underway in earnest. Produced at the ICAS Convention just before the end of the year, we were pleased to be able to tackle such important subjects as the industry made ready to start another year... but we apologize for some of the lighting, as we were stuck with some bad conditions and had to make the best of it. ICAS tells us that Airshows draw large numbers of demographically attractive spectators - a well-educated, affluent group of men, women and children of all ages. More than 70 percent of the audience at an air show has had some college education. Three quarters report household income of $35,000 or more. The average spectator is just under 39 years of age, but more than 53 percent of spectators are between 30 and 50. Safety has always been a major airshow concern but a series of unrelated accidents, this past year, to too many performers brought the topic to the forefront of discussion at the most recent ICAS get-together. ICAS notes that Airshows offer a consistently and historically safe environment for millions of spectators each year. Since current rules were implemented nearly 50 years ago, there has not been a single spectator fatality at a North American show – an enviable safety record for any business. But... they're not satisfied to leave it that. A 'small working group' of ICAS members recently met in Dallas to begin work on a new Safety Management System for the air show industry that will serve as an important tool in improving air show safety. Using existing safety management systems as models, ICAS members discussed the changes and accommodations needed to effectively adapt the work already done in other segments of the aviation industry to the particular needs and circumstances of the air show community. Conceived as part of the larger ICAS initiative to change the culture of air show safety, the product of this effort is intended to document processes and procedures that our industry can use to manage risk, report incidents and accidents, participate more actively in accident investigations, identify trends, communicate the results of these investigations to members, and reduce the number of accidents in the air show community. So... On To Part Three Of Aero-TV's Conversation With The Airshow Industry FMI: www.icashq**** Copyright 2008, Aero-News Network, Inc., ALL Rights Reserved.
10 May 2008
709
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0:01
Red Bull Gives You... Rotors? So what makes pilot Charles "Chuck" Aaron's airshow act so special? Well, all you had to do was watch his HELI-AEROBATIC act at Oshkosh to know that something SERIOUSLY DIFFERENT had come to Wittman Field. The Red Bull BO-105 CBS, made by Eurocopter/Messerschmitt Boelkow Blohm (MBB), blew everyone away with a routine rarely seen anywhere, much less at world-class airshow like Oshkosh. As noted in our 2008 Oshkosh coverage, how he got there is enough to write a book on. It almost seems that he was born into aviation, although Chuck will say he was never pushed into it. For him, his father (a flight instructor) was "my greatest inspiration." This ignited the fire... but it was rotorcraft that gave him that feeling of a "magic carpet ride." Fast forward several years... to when energy drink company Red Bull asked him if he could make a helicopter perform aerobatics. Chuck needed some time to ponder the notion, but he soon came around to the idea. However, it took one-and-a-half years to convince the FAA, and several modifications to his helicopter, to make that dream a reality. Besides the aerobatic certificate, Chuck also has an aerobatic move named after him -- similar to the Lomcevak, called (naturally) the "Chuckcevak." So what drives Chuck to do what he does? "I really want young kids to see what I'm doing, take that experience and take their own dreams and say what can I do that is as big as that is in aviation." And what's next for Chuck in all his endeavors? Chuck is working on making additional modifications to his aircraft so he can hover upside down. "It's going to take a lot of work and even though I know how to do it, it's going to take a lot of nerve to do it, and I'm just not there mentally yet," said Chuck. Come See One Of The Most Amazing Helicopter Flyers in The World... On Aero-TV! FMI: www.redbullusa****, www.aero-tv****, www.youtube****/aerotvnetwork, *******twitter****/AeroNews Copyright 2008, Aero-News Network, Inc., ALL Rights Reserved.
16 Dec 2008
1637
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