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3:28
Dr. Bob explains the symptoms of prostate cancer. Treatment options are also discussed. For more health tips and information visit *******www.DrBobShow****.
21 Mar 2012
393
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9:42
*******www.balancedhealthtoday****/endosterol.html Urinary problems are the most commonly encountered symptoms of prostate cancer, but these are not the only signs that can signal an underlying cancer. A Word of Caution About This List It’s important to remember the old adage that doctors are taught while in medical school -- that “common things are common.” In other words, the symptoms listed below are labeled as “less common” for a reason -– they are not what most men will experience. Most men who are diagnosed with prostate cancer today do not show any specific symptoms at the time of diagnosis and, amongst those who are having symptoms, the vast majority will experience only urinary symptoms. Additionally, this is by no means a complete list of possible less common symptoms because cancer can spread to any area of the body and cause virtually any symptom. The following symptoms are important to keep in mind, however, especially if you or a loved one has a high underlying risk of prostate cancer due to a strong family history of the disease or due to any other reason. Less Common Symptoms of Prostate Cancer Bone Pain Prostate cancer has a strong preference for spreading to the bones once it has moved beyond the immediate vicinity of the prostate. The most common areas of bone metastasis from prostate cancer are the lower spine, the pelvis, and the hips. These areas of metastasis will often be painful. Blood in the Urine or Semen The prostate’s primary function is to produce the fluid that makes up semen. If prostate cancer causes bleeding within the prostate, it is possible for this blood to be discharged in the semen. The urethra, a small tube carrying urine from the bladder through the penis to the outside of the body, passes through the prostate. Prostate cancer can sometimes invade or erode into the sides of the urethra and cause bleeding into the urine. Tingling, Numbness, and Pain in the Legs and Feet Prostate cancer has a strong preference for spreading to the bones, especially the lower spine, pelvis, and hips. If the cancer spreads to the lower spine or certain areas within the pelvis, it is possible for the tumor to compress important nerves that pass through these areas on their way to the legs. *******www.balancedhealthtoday****/products.html
17 Jan 2013
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41:09
Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 A patient with early prostate cancer may have the following signs and symptoms: A frequent or excessive need to urinate, during the day and/or at night Difficulty in starting, maintaining, or stopping the urine stream A weak or interrupted urine stream Straining to urinate Inability to urinate urinary retention Loss of control of urination that may be associated with coughing or laughing, a sudden urge to urinate, or without any forewarning Difficulty urinating when standing, requiring sitting during urination Pain with urination or ejaculation Blood in the urine or in the semen Abnormal rectal examination Many symptoms of early cancer of the prostate can also be attributed to benign noncancerous conditions of the prostate including benign prostatic hypertrophy BPH, or infection in the prostate gland or urinary system. Signs and symptoms of advanced prostate cancer that has already spread from the prostate gland to elsewhere in the body called metastatic prostate cancer include: A new dull, then progressively severe, pain in the bones, especially the low back Unexplained weight loss Fatigue Increasing shortness of breath while doing activities previously well tolerated Low-impact fracture of bones without a lot of trauma or broken bones from minor trauma It is always best to find and diagnose prostate cancer at an early stage and hopefully still confined to its site of origin. At that point treatments can cure it. When prostate cancer is widespread or metastatic it can be treated, but it cannot be cured.
25 Apr 2017
269
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41:09
A patient with early prostate cancer may have the following signs and symptoms: A frequent or excessive need to urinate, during the day and/or at night Difficulty in starting, maintaining, or stopping the urine stream A weak or interrupted urine stream Straining to urinate Inability to urinate (urinary retention) Loss of control of urination that may be associated with coughing or laughing, a sudden urge to urinate, or without any forewarning Difficulty urinating when standing, requiring sitting during urination Pain with urination or ejaculation Blood in the urine or in the semen Abnormal rectal examination Many symptoms of early cancer of the prostate can also be attributed to benign (noncancerous) conditions of the prostate including benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH), or infection in the prostate gland or urinary system.
7 Aug 2017
176
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1:05
*******askdrnerenberg**** Metastatic prostate cancer to the bone is one of the prostate cancer that have been bugging men around the world. To know more about it visit *******askdrnerenberg****
1 Sep 2009
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0:38
*******askdrnerenberg**** Stages of prostate cancer is very important to know. I can tell you that having prostate cancer is hard and that you need to be able to detect it at the very first stage to increase the chances for survival. Go to *******askdrnerenberg****
3 Sep 2009
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3:31
*******prostate-cancer-symptoms.info Prostate cancer usually does not cause symptoms in the beginning stages. By the time symptoms do occur, the disease may have spread beyond the prostate. Symptoms of prostate cancer may include the following: urinary problems, such as not being able to urinate, having a hard time starting or stopping the flow of urine, needing to urinate often, especially at night, weak flow of urine, urine flow that starts and stops, pain or burning during urination, difficulty having an erection, blood in the urine or semen, and/or frequent pain in the lower back, hips, or upper thighs. The "Prostate Cancer Treatment" report includes a review of possible signs and symptoms (such as weak flow of urine or painful ejactulation); descriptions of the various tests used for diagnosis (including digital rectal exam and prostate-specific antigen test); an explanation of the various stages of prostate cancer (Stages I, II, III, and IV); an overview of treatment options (including watchful waiting, surgery, and radation therapy); and also includes 10 pages of related medical terminology (to help you understand what your medical provider is talking about.
9 Oct 2009
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8:43
*******balancedhealthtoday****/endosterol.html Prostate cancer symptoms do not usually appear until the disease has advanced, and many times, has already been diagnosed. However, there are symptoms you should be aware of, especially those related to urination. Urinary Symptoms of Prostate Cancer The urethra is a small tube that runs from the bladder, allowing urine to exit the body. In men, the urethra is surrounded by the prostate, a walnut-shaped gland responsible for producing semen. As prostate cancer advances, the prostate enlarges and constricts the urethra. The result is various difficulties with urination. Urinary difficulties may be symptoms of prostate cancer, but can also indicate other non-cancerous prostate problems, like benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) . Prostate cancer symptoms related to urination include: burning or pain during urination inability to urinate frequent urination at night weak urine stream blood in urine (either seen by the eye or microscopically, although less common) *******balancedhealthtoday****/products.html
4 Jul 2012
210
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8:35
*******balancedhealthtoday****/endosterol.html Not everyone experiences symptoms of prostate cancer. Many times, signs of prostate cancer are first detected by a doctor during a routine check-up. Some men, however, will experience changes in urinary or sexual function that might indicate the presence of prostate cancer. These symptoms include: A need to urinate frequently, especially at night Difficulty starting urination or holding back urine Weak or interrupted flow of urine Painful or burning urination Difficulty in having an erection Painful ejaculation Blood in urine or semen Frequent pain or stiffness in the lower back, hips, or upper thighs You should consult with your doctor if you experience any of the symptoms above. Because these symptoms can also indicate the presence of other diseases or disorders, such as BPH or prostatitis, men will undergo a thorough work-up to determine the underlying cause. *******balancedhealthtoday****/products.html
5 Jul 2012
378
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4:57
*******www.balancedhealthtoday****/endosterol.html Prostate cancer frequently does not produce any symptoms until the condition is quite advanced. Often it is diagnosed after treatment is sought for problems with urinary function. Symptoms of prostate cancer are often similar to those of benign (non-cancerous) prostate conditions. Common symptoms include: Decreased force of the urine stream Pain and/or difficulty when passing urine Passing urine more frequently (especially at night) Blood in the urine Inability to pass urine (this can occur as the cancer enlarges, blocking the urethra). It is possible for the cancer cells to spread from the prostate gland to other areas of the body (metastasise) where further tumours can develop. The most common places for prostate cancer to spread to are the lymph nodes of the pelvis and the bones of the spine. Spread of the cancer can produce symptoms such as lower back pain. *******www.balancedhealthtoday****/products.html
17 Jan 2013
465
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9:43
*******www.balancedhealthtoday****/endosterol.html BPH - Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia BPH is a benign (non-cancerous) enlargement of the prostate that is extremely common in older men. It is generally thought to be caused by years of exposure to male hormones like testosterone. BPH is such a common cause of an enlarged prostate that it is often simply referred to as "enlarged prostate." While BPH is benign and cannot spread to other parts of the body, it can cause problems. If the prostate enlarges enough, the flow of urine out of the body can be obstructed. If this obstruction is severe enough, it can result in kidney damage. Usually, medication can be given to reduce the prostate swelling so that urine may flow more freely. If medication does not work and the obstruction is severe enough, surgery may be required to relieve the obstruction. Prostate Cancer Prostate cancer can also result in an enlarged prostate. BPH is a much more common cause of an enlarged prostate, but, because the symptoms of prostate cancer and BPH can be identical, there is no way to safely determine which is causing a man's urinary symptoms. Prostate cancer can often be diagnosed early and treated successfully. Often, treating a man's prostate cancer results in significant improvement of his urinary symptoms because the prostate is either removed or decreased in size. Prostatitis Prostatitis results from any kind of inflammation or infection of the prostate. When the prostate is inflamed, it often swells temporarily and can cause obstruction of urine. Prostatitis due to infection can be treated with antibiotics and prostatitis due to most other reasons will typically disappear relatively quickly. As the prostatitis improves, the prostatic enlargement will also improve. *******www.balancedhealthtoday****/products.html
17 Jan 2013
505
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41:09
Balanced Health Today Call Now 1(888)277-4980 When a man reaches his mid-40s, the area of the prostate that encircles the urethra begins to grow. This overgrowth of prostate tissue is called benign prostatic hyperplasia, or BPH. With continued growth, the expanding prostate may constrict the urethra, causing symptoms such as difficulty starting urination or a weak urine stream. BPH occurs in approximately 31 percent of men between the ages of 50 and 59, 36 percent of men age 60 to 69, and 44 percent of those who are age 70 and older. Not all of these men experience urinary tract problems related to BPH, but many do. Although BPH can cause a number of bothersome symptoms, it is not life threatening. Prostate cancer Cancer of the prostate is a much more serious health problem than BPH. After skin cancer, it is the second most common cancer in American men and is second only to lung cancer as a cause of cancer deaths. In 2010, an estimated 218,000 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer, and about 33,000 died of the disease, according to the American Cancer Society. The good news is that today, reliable diagnostic tests and numerous treatment options are available, and death rates from prostate cancer are now on the decline. Nearly 100 percent of men are still alive five years after a prostate cancer diagnosis, more than 93 percent are alive 10 years after diagnosis, and approximately 79 percent are alive 15 years after diagnosis. Although the symptoms of prostate cancer are similar to those of BPH, the conditions are not related. Having BPH neither increases nor decreases a man's risk of prostate cancer. In addition, it is possible for a man to have both conditions at the same time.
22 Mar 2017
365
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