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1:18
"Lady Red Variation I: Lady Killahs" by Josh Morrow, mini-music video by Cosmic Control Productions for the collection of shorts, "The Lady Red Trio"
13 Dec 2006
1062
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9:50
This vintage excerpt from NY's long-running JON HAMMOND Show on MCTV & Time Warner includes Jon's band performing at INTIM BAR in Frankfurt's Red Light District with U.S. Air Force Sgt. AL WITTIG on tenor sax, ANDREAS NEUBAUER-drms, BARRY FINNERTY-gtr. and JON HAMMOND-org/bass playing original tune "Head Phone" *Spcl. thanks: HANS ROMANOV. Then a quick trip to Paris, exclusive footage inside RADIO FRANCE INTER Concert Hall of pianist FRANCOISE PUJOL Trio with RICHARD BONA - acs. bass, and FRANCIS LASSUS - batterie/drms. Francoise's tune "Blase' Bleu" and Video by LORI. Enjoy! *******www.HammondCast****
5 Aug 2007
1208
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5:51
Details Unveiled Today Orlando, Fla. Rising up in Orlando is a whimsical, one of a kind water park only SeaWorld could create Aquatica. Opening March 2008, Aquatica blends up close animal experiences, waters from serene to extreme, high speed thrills and wide, sandy beaches. SeaWorld is famous for immersing guests in the mystery of the sea and its animals, said Jim Atchison, executive vice president and general manager of SeaWorld Orlando. Aquatica takes this immersion to a new level, inviting guests to play in, over, and under the water itself. Setting foot into Aquatica, guests immediately experience the vastness of nearly 60 acres of lush landscape inspired by the vivid color, stunning flora and carefree personality of the South Sea Islands. Reminiscent of the rugged beauty of New Zealand, Australia and New Guinea, the landscape of Aquatica is striking. Crystal blue rivers wind through hidden grottos and refreshing waterfalls, while rich greenery and bright flowers adorn towering rock formations. Peeking through this verdant landscape, brightly colored, quirky buildings topped with swooping, pitched roofs create an uplifting, carefree setting. Colorful, whimsical animals derivative patterns from New Zealand's Maori culture adorn carved totem poles and interactive fountains. Live animals from lands all over the world including Commersons dolphins, brilliant macaws and colorful fish bring to life the park's playful, high energy nature. Aquatica features the most thrilling water rides in the world with 36 water slides, six rivers and lagoons, and more than 80,000 square feet of beach area. Designed in a way that could only be done by SeaWorld, these distinct attractions will zoom, float and splash guests through amazing animal habitats and undersea adventures. The parks signature attraction plunges riders in clear tubes through a crystal-blue lagoon with black-and-white Commersons dolphins. Guests feel as if they are flying beneath the sea among these beautiful animals. While similar in coloration to SeaWorlds icon, Shamu, these dolphins are also distinctly different. In addition to being much smaller, they are also fast, agile swimmers making them the perfect inhabitants for this lively park. Aquaticas attractions offer equal emphasis on high energy thrill rides and immersive swimming experiences. A colorful mix of racing tunnels, raft rides and rivers offer crashing surf and high speed thrills, while pools, lagoons and lazy rivers invite guests to enjoy slower pace. Many of the parks attractions even offer dual experiences within the same ride. Two immense wave lagoons create the world's only side by side wave pools that can be operated independently or together. Though side by side, each lagoon offers a very different experience one with crashing waves and 5 foot swells, the other with a gently rolling surf. Nine different wave patterns can be created throughout the two pools, with the ability to generate one immense wave, or even dueling waves. Winding rivers throughout Aquatica also offer two different journeys from serene to extreme. One river carries guests through gentle waterfalls, past exotic birds and into an undersea grotto with thousands of colorful fish. An adjacent river offers pure thrill, jetting riders through rolling rapids, rushing geysers and racing waters. Colorful eight lane racing slides, triple drop raft rides, double inner tubes, and a 6 story family ride round out the mix of thrills. Even the littlest swimmers will enjoy one of a kind attractions at Aquatica. One of the worlds largest interactive water play areas includes a colorful rain fortress that towers 60 feet above a 15,000 square foot pool. The entire family can zoom together on slides and blast water cannons. In a separate childrens pool, even those Aquatica guests not old enough to walk can still slide down tubes with Mom and Dad in specially built rafts. Plenty of wide, sand beaches, refreshing lagoons and cool shade from towering oaks and exotic trees create the ultimate water park for guest comfort. Personal cabanas dot the shoreline for those who desire a private retreat. The entire park is designed to limit wait times and provide easy access to rides, attractions and even restaurants. Those who don't want to leave the comfort of their lounge chair can even enjoy beachside waiter service. All of this allows more time for carefree family fun. Aquatica will be the natural complement to a full days adventure at SeaWorld Orlando, and create a trio of SeaWorld parks in Central Florida that collectively provide experiences found nowhere else in the world. In a destination famous for immersing families in fun, the SeaWorld parks offer the ultimate in family togetherness, connecting guests to the sea and with each other in three immersive, interactive, but very different, ways, said Joe Couceiro, corporate vice president of marketing. Guests are amazed by the wonders of the sea at SeaWorld. They can then visit Aquatica to indulge in the playfulness of the sea, as they zoom, float and splash through amazing animal habitats. For the ultimate in immersion, the companys Discovery Cove park offers a completely different experience an exclusive tropical paradise, with limited attendance, where guests have up-close encounters with Atlantic bottlenose dolphins, rays and tropical fish. Whether making wondrous connections, having carefree fun, or enjoying up close animal encounters, the SeaWorld parks offer guests an unmatched Orlando family vacation. Natural, exotic, untamed, fun SeaWorlds new water park, Aquatica, has an attitude all its own. Offering fun as endless as the sea itself, it's not what you would expect from a water park, unless that park is created by SeaWorld.
5 Mar 2007
17016
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1:16
Sisterhood and girl power is alive in Big Bad Sis, where three textile factory co-workers defend themselves against bullying colleagues, male thugs and a nasty casino boss. Leading the trio is 'Fearless Ying,' a tough-fisted woman on the outside but a girl in love inside. To everyone else though, she is 'Big Bad Sis.' Directed by Sun Chung, who is famous for his sweeping camera work and fluid action. Kung-fu fans will also enjoy kung-fu legend Chen Kuan-tai who appears as a teahouse owner who joins forces with the women.
11 Apr 2007
5880
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3:17
Magic Music November 2000 saw the launch of `Stonehenge 4 - Echoes of ancient Mysteries' of Hatfield's End. Stonehenge 4 of Hatfield's was presented as `An English production', composed and executed by a group called Hatfield's End. It is possible they consist of two people; the inlay only shows two pairs of eyes. The recording location is The Hannover House, South England. Does this mean something to you? The label on the disc makes me think of Pink Floyd of Syd Barett. In short - Mysteries..! The mysterious act is successful. For twenty weeks the album reaches the Top 100, the highest place being 33. The mystery remains, no-one guesses the identity. On the internet crazy rumours circulate - Syd Barett, the psychotic creator of Pink Floyd, may be part of the group! October 2005 - the new album of Hatfield's End “Revealing the Myth - Stonehenge 5” is launched. Exactly 5 years after Stonehenge 4. The description of the music is still the same as for the previous album, i.e. in a truly sublime quality of sound (we may safely speak of an audiofile miracle) a musical world is presented which seemed lost forever. However, the album differs from its predecessor through more use of accoustical instruments, which causes the end result of its sound to be even `warmer'. And…is the mystery still a mystery?? No, the composer of Hatfield's End - Stonehenge 4, Revealing the Myth - Stonehenge 5' is the 55-year old musicist Paul Hattink, an inhabitant of Breda, the Netherlands. For many years in his Furrier Studios Paul has laboured on the compositions which are so characteristic for his two albums. Paul has a long musical career, with local bands like Splash Down and Aubergine as well as the soundmix show of Hennie Huisman with “Na, Na, Na” of The Shoes. He also performs as a classical pianist entertainer and plays at parties with his trio The Paul Hattink Band. There are also several radio commercials. He is very knowledgeable as far as high-end stereo apparatus is concerned, and imports and is sales representative of the brands Accuphase (in Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg) and Cabasse (the Netherlands). He has published articles in a journal named Audio-Opinie under a pseudonym (“Jean Hauteparleur”).
20 May 2007
2108
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0:18
Starring Feeks, Abbagasizzle, and Ekoorb! While searching for a yeti, this trio accidentally hit one of the themselves, FEEKS!! Gah!!
31 May 2007
234
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0:42
"The Adventures of Teddy Ruxpin" was a television series that ran from 1987-1988. Teddy Ruxpin leaves his homeland in Rillonia with his friend Grubby in search of adventure. They meet up with an inventor named Newton Gimmick who accompanies them on their quest for the Treasure of Grundo. What the trio unexpectedly find are six crystals with different meanings and powers. These crystals, however, also can enable the Monsters and Villains Organization (MAVO) to have absolute power over the land, and their leader, Quellor, wants to make sure that an Illiop never possesses the crystals. Elsewhere, a less pronounced threat also routinely besieges the trio, the wannabe villain Jack W. Tweeg, a greedy troll/grunge who has his eyes on joining MAVO. The sixty five episode series unfolds gradually as the Trio meet interesting and often friendly creatures while visiting intriguing lands and going on wondrous, yet wholesome, adventures. read more at the Teddy Ruxpin wiki page. Please rank, and see my other movies. Thanks!
13 Jun 2007
5226
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16:59
Les 20 ans de Caroline. Diaporama de photos en musique : Arroro (berceuse de Majorque) + Litanei, de Franz Schubert (version arrangée pour choeur, voix solo, piano & orchestre symphonique). Diaporama de photos, avec musique : - Arroro (berceuse de Majorque), pour voix solo (ténor) + choeur mixte - Litanei, de Franz Schubert (1797–1828), en version arrangée pour choeur, voix solo, piano et orchestre symphonique. Litanei demeure assurément l’un des plus émouvants et accomplis, émanant du génie mélodique & harmonique de Franz Schubert ! La synergie musicale spirituelle particulièrement aigue, délicate et la symbiose élégiaque ne peuvent qu’aller droit au cœur. This beautiful song was composed by Franz Schubert in 1818 (last of the Jacobi songs) for the celebration of All Saint's Day and then subsequently arranged for solo voice, male choir, piano & symphonic orchestra. Of a deep devotional nature, this Lied shows an exquisite example of humble affection. Each verse ends with the refrain: - Alle Seelen, Ruhn in Frieden - All Souls rest in peace Franz Schubert Franz Schubert Franz Seraphicus Peter Schubert (January 31, 1797 – November 19, 1828) was an Austrian composer. He wrote some 600 Lieder, seven completed symphonies, the famous "Unfinished Symphony", liturgical music, operas, and a large body of chamber and solo piano music. He is particularly noted for his original melodic and harmonic writing. While Schubert had a close circle of friends and associates who admired his work (including his teacher Antonio Salieri, and the prominent singer Johann Michael Vogl), wider appreciation of his music during his lifetime was limited at best. He was never able to secure adequate permanent employment, and for most of his career he relied on the support of friends and family. Interest in Schubert's work increased dramatically following his death. Biography Early life and education Schubert was born in Vienna, Austria on January 31, 1797. His father Franz Theodor Florian, the son of a Moravian peasant, was a parish schoolmaster; his mother Elizabeth Vietz was the daughter of a Silesian master locksmith, and had also been a housemaid for a Viennese family prior to her marriage. Of the Schuberts' fifteen children (one illegitimate child was born in 1789), ten died in infancy; only four survived. Their father Franz Theodor was a well-known teacher, and his school on the Himmelpfortgrund was well attended.[citation needed] He was not a famous musician, but he taught his son what he could of music. At the age of five, Schubert began receiving regular instruction from his father and a year later was enrolled at the Himmelpfortgrund school. His formal musical education also began around the same time. His father continued to teach him the basics of the violin. At seven, Schubert was placed under the instruction of Michael Holzer. Holzer's lessons seem to have mainly consisted of conversations and expressions of admiration[1] and the boy gained more from his acquaintance with a friendly joiner's apprentice who used to take him to a neighboring pianoforte warehouse where he was given the opportunity to practice on better instruments. The unsatisfactory nature of Schubert's early training was even more pronounced during his time given that composers could expect little chance of success unless they were also able to appeal to the public as performers. To this end, Schubert's meager musical education was never entirely sufficient. In October 1808, he was received as a pupil at the Stadtkonvikt (Imperial religious boarding school) through a choir scholarship. It was at the Stadtkonvikt that Schubert was introduced to the overtures and symphonies of Mozart. His exposure to these pieces as well as various lighter compositions combined with his occasional visits to the opera set the foundation for his greater musical knowledge. Franz Schubert aged 16, drawn by Leopold KupelweiserMeanwhile, his genius was already beginning to show itself in his compositions. Antonio Salieri, a leading composer of the period, became aware of the talented young man and decided to train him in musical composition and music theory. Schubert's early essay in chamber music is noticeable, since we learn that at the time a regular quartet-party was established at his home "on Sundays and holidays," in which his two brothers played the violin, his father the cello and Franz himself the viola. It was the first germ of that amateur orchestra for which, in later years, many of his compositions were written. During the remainder of his stay at the Stadtkonvikt he wrote a good deal more chamber music, several songs, some miscellaneous pieces for the pianoforte and, among his more ambitious efforts, a Kyrie (D.31) and Salve Regina (D.27), an octet for wind instruments (D.72/72a) - said to commemorate the death of his mother, which took place in 1812 - a cantata (D.110), words and music, for his father's name-day in 1813, and the closing work of his school-life, his first symphony (D.82). Teacher at his father's school At the end of 1813 he left the Stadtkonvikt and entered his father's school as teacher of the lowest class. In the meantime, his father remarried, this time to Anna Kleyenboeck, the daughter of a silk dealer from the suburb Gumpendorf. For over two years the young man endured the drudgery of the work, which he performed with very indifferent success. There were, however, other interests to compensate. He received private lessons in composition from Salieri, who did more for Schubert’s training than any of his other teachers. Supported by friends As 1815 was the most prolific period of Schubert's life, 1816 saw the first real change in his fortunes. Somewhere about the turn of the year Spaun surprised him in the composition of Erlkönig (D.328, published as Op.1) — Goethe's poem propped among a heap of exercise books, and the boy at white-heat of inspiration "hurling" the notes on the music-paper. A few weeks later Franz von Schober, a student of good family and some means, who had heard some of Schubert's songs at Spaun's house, came to pay a visit to the composer and proposed to carry him off from school-life and give him freedom to practice his art in peace. The proposal was particularly opportune, for Schubert had just made an unsuccessful application for the post of Kapellmeister at Laibach (the German name for Ljubljana), and was feeling more acutely than ever the slavery of the classroom. His father's consent was readily given, and before the end of the spring he was installed as a guest in Schober's lodgings. For a time he attempted to increase the household resources by giving music lessons, but they were soon abandoned, and he devoted himself to composition. "I write all day," he said later to an inquiring visitor, "and when I have finished one piece I begin another." All this time his circle of friends was steadily widening. Mayrhofer introduced him to Johann Michael Vogl, a famous baritone, who did him good service by performing his songs in the salons of Vienna; Anselm Hüttenbrenner and his brother Joseph ranged themselves among his most devoted admirers; Joseph von Gahy, an excellent pianist, played his sonatas and fantasias; the Sonnleithners, a burgher family whose eldest son had been at the Stadtkonvikt, gave him free access to their home, and organized in his honor musical parties which soon assumed the name of Schubertiaden. The material needs of life were supplied without much difficulty. No doubt Schubert was entirely penniless, for he had given up teaching, he could earn nothing by public performance, and, as yet, no publisher would take his music at a gift; but his friends came to his aid with true Bohemian generosity — one found him lodging, another found him appliances, they took their meals together and the man who had any money paid the score. Schubert was always the leader of the party, but more often than not, was penniless. Though he was known by half a dozen affectionate nicknames, the most characteristic was kann er 'was? ("Is he able?") or more colloquially, "Can he pay?" (for the food and drink), his usual question when a new acquaintance was introduced. Another nickname was "The Little Mushroom" as Schubert was only five feet, one and one-half inches tall (1.56 m), and tended to corpulence. The compositions of 1820 are remarkable, and show a marked advance in development and maturity of style. The unfinished oratorio "Lazarus" (D.689) was begun in February; later followed, amid a number of smaller works, by the 23rd Psalm (D.706), the Gesang der Geister (D.705/714), the Quartettsatz in C minor (D.703), and the "Wanderer Fantasy" for piano (D.760). But of almost more biographical interest is the fact that in this year two of Schubert's operas appeared at the Kärntnerthor Theater, Die Zwillingsbrüder (D.647) on June 14, and Die Zauberharfe (D.644) on August 19. Hitherto his larger compositions (apart from Masses) had been restricted to the amateur orchestra at the Gundelhof, a society which grew out of the quartet-parties at his home. Now he began to assume a more prominent position and address a wider public. Still, however, publishers remained obstinately aloof, and it was not until his friend Vogl had sung Erlkönig at a concert (Feb. 8, 1821) that Anton Diabelli hesitatingly agreed to print some of his works on commission. The first seven opus numbers (all songs) appeared on these terms; then the commission ceased, and he began to receive the meagre pittances which were all that the great publishing houses ever accorded to him. Much has been written about the neglect from which he suffered during his lifetime. It was not the fault of his friends, it was only indirectly the fault of the Viennese public; the persons most to blame were the cautious intermediaries who stinted and hindered him from publication. The production of his two dramatic pieces turned Schubert's attention more firmly than ever in the direction of the stage; and towards the end of 1821 he set himself on a course which for nearly three years brought him continuous mortification and disappointment. Alfonso und Estrella was refused, and so was Fierabras (D.796); Die Verschworenen (D.787) was prohibited by the censor (apparently on the ground of its title); Rosamunde (D.797) was withdrawn after two nights, owing to the poor quality of its libretto. Of these works the two former are written on a scale which would make their performances exceedingly difficult (Fierabras, for instance, contains over 1,000 pages of manuscript score), but Die Verschworenen is a bright attractive comedy, and Rosamunde contains some of the most charming music that Schubert ever composed. In 1822 he made the acquaintance both of Weber and of Beethoven, but little came of it in either case, though Beethoven cordially acknowledged his genius, the quote attributed to Beethoven being: "Truly, the spark of divine genius resides in this Schubert!" Schober was away from Vienna; new friends appeared of a less desirable character; on the whole these were the darkest years of his life. In 1994 musicologist Rita Steblin discovered Schubert's brother Karl's marriage petition on the attic floor of the Lichtental church. The composer's own wish to marry Therese Grob was hindered by Metternich's harsh marriage consent law of 1815, as Schubert's heart-rending cry in his diary of September 1816 makes clear. Last years and masterworks In 1823 appeared Schubert's first song cycle, Die schöne Müllerin (D.795), after poems by Wilhelm Müller. This work, together with the later cycle "Winterreise" (D.911; also written to texts of Müller) is widely considered one of the pinnacles of Schubert's work and of the German Lied in general. The piece "Du bist die Ruh" ("My sweet repose") was also composed during this year. In the spring of 1824 he wrote the Octet in F (D.803), "A Sketch for a Grand Symphony"; and in the summer went back to Želiezovce, when he became attracted by Hungarian idiom, and wrote the Divertissement a l'Hongroise (D.818) and the String Quartet in A minor (D.804). He held a hopeless passion for his pupil Countess Karoline Eszterházy; but whatever may be said about this romance, its details are not presently known. Despite his preoccupation with the stage and later with his official duties, he found time during these years for a good deal of miscellaneous composition. The Mass in A flat (D.678) was completed and the "Unfinished Symphony" (Symphony No. 8 in B minor, D.759) begun in 1822. The question of why the symphony was "unfinished" has been debated endlessly and is still unresolved. To 1824, beside the works mentioned above, belong the variations for flute and piano on Trockne Blumen, from the cycle Die schöne Müllerin. There is also a sonata for piano and arpeggione (D.821). This music is nowadays usually played by either cello or viola and piano, although a number of other arrangements have been made. The mishaps of the recent years were compensated by the prosperity and happiness of 1825. Publication had been moving more rapidly; the stress of poverty was for a time lightened; in the summer there was a pleasant holiday in Upper Austria, where Schubert was welcomed with enthusiasm. It was during this tour that he produced his "Songs from Sir Walter Scott". This cycle contains his famous and beloved Ellens dritter Gesang (D.839). This is today more popularly, though mistakenly, referred to as "Schubert's Ave Maria"; while he had set it to Adam Storck's German translation of Scott's hymn from The Lady of the Lake that happens to open with the greeting Ave Maria and also has it for its refrain, subsequently the entire Scott/Storck text in Schubert's song came to be substituted with the complete Latin text of the traditional Ave Maria prayer; and it is in this adaptation that this song of Schubert's is commonly sung today. During this time he also wrote the Piano Sonata in A minor (D.845, Op. 42) and the Symphony No. 9 (D.944), which is believed to have been completed the following year, in 1826. From 1826 to 1828 Schubert resided continuously in Vienna, except for a brief visit to Graz in 1827. The history of his life during these three years is little more than a record of his compositions. The only events worth notice are that in 1826 he dedicated a symphony to the Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde and received an honorarium in return. In the spring of 1828 he gave, for the first and only time in his career, a public concert of his own works which was very well received. But the compositions themselves are a sufficient biography. The String Quartet in D minor (D.810), with the variations on Death and the Maiden, was written during the winter of 1825-1826, and first played on January 25, 1826. Later in the year came the String Quartet in G major, the "Rondeau brilliant" for piano and violin (D.895, Op.70), and the Piano Sonata in G (D.894, Op.78) (first published under the title "Fantasia in G"). To these should be added the three Shakespearian songs, of which "Hark! Hark! the Lark" (D.889) and "Who is Sylvia?" (D.891) were allegedly written on the same day, the former at a tavern where he broke his afternoon's walk, the latter on his return to his lodging in the evening. In 1827 Schubert wrote the song cycle Winterreise (D.911), a colossal peak of the art of art-song, the Fantasia for piano and violin in C (D.934), and the two piano trios (B flat, D.898; and E flat, D.929): in 1828 the Song of Miriam, the Mass in E-flat (D.950), the Tantum Ergo (D.962) in the same key, the String Quintet in C (D.956), the second Benedictus to the Mass in C, the last three piano sonatas, and the collection of songs published posthumously under the fanciful name of Schwanengesang ("Swan-song", D.957), which whilst not a true song cycle, retains a unity of style amongst the individual songs, touching unwonted depths of tragedy and the morbidly supernatural. Six of these are to words by Heinrich Heine, whose Buch der Lieder appeared in the autumn. The Symphony No. 9 (D.944) is dated 1828, and many modern Schubert scholars (including Brian Newbould) believe that this symphony, written in 1825-6, was revised for performance in 1828 (a fairly unusual practice for Schubert, for whom publication, let alone performance, was rarely contemplated for many of his larger-scale works during his lifetime). In the last weeks of his life he began to sketch three movements for a new Symphony in D (D.936A). The works of his last two years reveal a composer increasingly meditating on the darker side of the human psyche and human relationships, and with a deeper sense of spiritual awareness and conception of the 'beyond', reaching extraordinary depths in several chillingly dark songs of this period, especially in the larger cycles, (the song Der Doppelgaenger reaching an extraordinary climax, conveying madness at the realization of rejection and imminent death, and yet able to touch repose and communion with the infinite in the almost timeless ebb and flow of the String Quintet). Schubert expressed the wish, were he to survive his final illness, to further develop his knowledge of harmony and counterpoint. Death Schubert's grave in the Zentralfriedhof, Vienna.In the midst of this creative activity, his health deteriorated. He had battled syphilis since 1822. The final illness may have been typhoid fever, though other causes have been proposed; some of his final symptoms match those of mercury poisoning (mercury was a common treatment for syphilis in the early 19th century). At any rate, insufficient evidence remains to make a definitive diagnosis. His solace in his final illness was reading, and he had become a passionate fan of the writings of James Fenimore Cooper. He died aged 31 on Wednesday November 19, 1828 at the apartment of his brother Ferdinand in Vienna. At 3pm that afternoon "someone observed that he had ceased to breathe." By his own request, he was buried next to Beethoven, whom he had adored all his life, in the village cemetery of Währing. In 1888, both Schubert's and Beethoven's graves were moved to the Zentralfriedhof, where they can now be found next to those of Johann Strauss II and Johannes Brahms. In 1872, a memorial to Franz Schubert was erected in Vienna's Stadtpark. Souvenir souvenirs 20 ans an année années Villaz St-Pierre Suisse Switzerland Schweiz Svizzera Jean-Marie Annamarie Caroline Dévaud parcours bébé bébés bambin bambines bambina bambine enfant enfants enfance enfances adolescence famille familles familial familiaux mère père nono nona grand-mère grand-père chant chants chanteur chanteurs chœur chœurs orchestre piano cordes violon violons chanson chansons adolescent adolescents touchant touchants touchante touchantes émotion émotions célèbre célèbres mélodie mélodies connu connus connue connues mémorable mémorables inoubliable inoubliables berceuse berceuses nostalgie nostalgies nostalgique nostalgiques maman papa mamans papas anniversaire anniversaries célébration célébrations commemoration commemorations family families birthday 20 year years time times child children childhood childish baby babies daughter daughters girl girls parent parents mother mothers father fathers grand dad mum dads mums daddy daddies mummy mummies life birth naissance celebration bébé bambin gamin gamine enfance enfants enfant innocence pureté parent parents grands-parents papa maman progéniture progénitures famille family famiglia mamma nona nono Litany life birth
27 Jun 2007
4497
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3:03
a ride by the beach in new jersey to music by the chain saw trio
28 Jun 2007
359
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3:48
I wanted to say thanks to everyone that helped get me to New York! Make sure to check out everyone's site! These are some amazing people! BIG THANKS TO NILS FROM BUZZMEISTER! *******www.BUZZMEISTER**** TubeMogul: *******www.tubemogule**** ___________ OneSix Clothing: *******www.onesixtees**** ___________ Elsie Richardson: (botbabe4msn****} ___________ Animé Dan: *******www.youtube****/jumpnbounce ___________ TheBeatlesNvrDie5: *******www.youtube****/TheBeatlesNvrDie5 ___________ JealousGuy: *******www.youtube****/JealousGuy ___________ The John Butler Trio: *******www.johnbutlertrio**** ___________ Michelle5451: *******www.youtube****/Michelle5451 ___________ Fexd: *******www.fexd**** ___________ Esmeralda Valdez ___________ newfounddeath: *******www.youtube****/newfounddeath ___________ Minx ___________ Peter from *******www.advertcube**** I also wanted to say thanks to: Themightythor1212 - *******www.youtube****/themightythor1212 and Eliza D for everything as well!! Well, it's time to go run-a-muck here in the city! I'll try and keep the camera on, but i'm sure there are going to be hundreds of other videos to watch from the same event!
12 Jul 2007
625
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4:53
I played 207 gigs in the famous JAZZ KNEIPE Frankfurt at Berlinerstr. 70 until Regina the boss finally closed the doors and moved to Spain a few years ago, usually in Duo, sometimes as Trio but more often than not as Solo. This was a special occasion because my bandmates from California came over so I had them on the gig with addition of Sgt. Al Wittig of U.S. Air Force on tenor, James Preston of Sons of Champlin band drums, Barry Finnerty gtr., myself Jon Hammond at XB-2 Hammond organ. This was a very special place frequented by all the musicians after there gigs. A 5 hour gig until wee hours of the morning, Live Music 7 days a week in rotation with musicians like Piano George, Izio Gross, Wilson de Oliveira and members of HR Bigband. Regina introduced me to Tony Lakatos the Hungarian tenor saxophonist who I play with still today. The club was not large but it had a great atmosphere and was always a safe place to hang out until as late as 5AM. Sadly the Jazz Kneipe is still shuttered there on Berlinerstr. directly behind the Frankfurter Hof Hotel. All musicians tip their hat when they pass by. There's a lot of music in those walls! JH Band original composition "Head Phone" with Atilla Zoller (RIP) in the house that night. c)2007 *******www.HammondCast**** Catch HammondCast Radio Show 7 mornings a week 4AM PST on KYOU 1550AM
2 Sep 2007
874
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3:09
On todays episode of Bleacher Bloggers we discuss a trio of MLBers chasing milestones, the Dodgers celebrate Steroids Awareness, Brent gets skewered on YouTube, and Yankees Chick is back to break down the Pinstripes moves at the trading deadline. Links: *******yankees-chick.blogspot****/ *******100percentinjuryrate.blogspot****/ *******meetatthebat.blogspot****/ *******blogs.trb****/sports/baseball/mets/blog/ *******mikeybronx.blogspot****/
3 Aug 2007
896
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1:27
To envy the Celtic Warriors is Human. To Journey with them is divine. Join the charismatic trio of legendary warriors as they delve into the sanctity of the Salmon Leap Maneuver.
21 Aug 2007
3713
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6:54
Please rate this video - RIALCRIS TRIO - 2007. The Original and Only Circo Atayde Hnos. 2008 Marks the 120 year anniversary of the Atayde family's renowned spectacular circus, magic, theater, music and performing arts exhibition.
22 Aug 2007
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0:53
MxPx began as three 15-year-old kids who called themselves Magnified Plaid, that started playing music inspired by and similar to The Descendents, NOFX, and other Southern California skate punk bands. The trio were classmates at Central Kitsap High School in nearby Silverdale, WA. However, the name was a tribute to the original guitarist's fascination with plaid shirts but it didn't fit on the band's posters. Consequently, the name was abbreviated to M.P. But in Yuri Ruley's handwriting, periods appeared as "X"'s, and since he made up the show posters for the band, the four-letter moniker stuck.
7 Sep 2007
788
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12:16
Gearwire talks to George Hunter and Miguel Castillo of the Chicago-based roots trio, Catfish Haven. George and Miguel explain their straightforward approach to songwriting, recording, and performing See www.gearwire**** for more info!
18 Sep 2007
533
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