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4:03
The late 60's and early '70's were a time of tremendous upheaval in American culture as the hippie generation abandoned the values of their parents, turned to drugs and away from materialism, and went on a search for love and peace. It was out of this tumultuous era that young, musical voices began to surface. These newly converted musicians began singing about the new hope they had found through Jesus Christ. Matthew Ward was one of these young voices. Go behind the scenes with him to look at this exciting era in this clip from, "First Love". Find the entire "First Love" DVD/CD pack at *******www.explorationfilms****/exploration-films-first-love.html
2 Jul 2008
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2:57
gamblerstelevision**** Hello pro football fans from our “Rockstar” studio this is Dana Ward here with a quick hitter from the NFL. The Chicago Bears followed-up their 2006 Super Bowl appearance with a disappointing 7 and 9 record in the 2007 season. The Bears defense was hit with multiple injuries to key personnel, so a return to great form is a possibility this season. The Bears three-time Pro Bowl defensive tackle Tommie Harris got a 40-million dollar contract extension from Chicago in the off-season. But there is a contract dispute with middle linebacker Brian Urlacher that is still pending and because of it, Urlacher has threatened to miss training camp. But the issue that had all Bears fans frustrated about last season was their quarterback situation. As we are less than a month away from training camp, the number-1 and number-2 quarterbacks on the Bears depth chart are Rex Grossman and Kyle Orton, as Brian Griese is now a Tampa Bay Buccaneer. With no quarterback selected during the draft and no quarterback free agent signing in the off-season, Bears fans have been left scratching their heads. Can the Bears really endure another year of chaos at the quarterback position? Well, offensive co-coordinator Rob Turner was quoted as saying that the quarterback race is dead-even heading into training camp. Things have gotten to the point that the Chicago Tribune ran a story over the weekend pondering the possibility of former or present or somewhere in between Green Bay Packer quarterback Bret Favre playing for the Bears next season. The Trib ran a poll on their website with 65-percent responding in favor of Bret Favre being in a Bear uniform as the starting quarterback. ESPN reported over the weekend that Favre was considering coming out of retirement. But he responded that it was all rumor and there was no need for all the media coverage about his NFL return. He still has two years remaining on his contract and already walked away from 25-million dollars. It would be very doubtful for the Packers to trade Favre to a division rival. The Bears released veteran running-back Cedric Benson and are hoping that Adrian Peterson, Garrett Wolfe and their young slew of backs behind them can carry the load. The Bears are counting on more big plays from their talented wideout and kick return specialist, Devin Hester. Hester possesses a great burst of speed and when in the open field is always a threat to score. Recent form has fantasy football experts recommending to pass on both roster quarterbacks for league owners. The Bears open the season Sunday September 7th on the road against the Indianapolis Colts. The Bears are currently a 9-point underdog in their opener, and oddsmakers have made the Bears a 30 to 1 longshot to win Super Bowl 43. That will do it for today’s NFL coverage. This is Dana Ward from our “Rockstar” Studio. Keep your browser aimed at GamblersTelevision**** for NFL coverage with a little Vegas style. See you next time.
8 Jul 2008
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1:39
This is exclusive footage of "NYC's Heat," The Untouchable DJ Drastic with Island/So So Def Recording Artists 9th Ward & Nitti. The Untouchable DJ Drastic touches down to chop it up with Jermaine Dupri's protégé at Island Offices. This footage is provided courtesy of BSE Films. For more information regarding The Untouchable DJ Drastic contact TCNManagementGroupgmail****
8 Jul 2008
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3:24
My first and simple tutorial of Shayne Ward Until You. I hope this helps. The Bass: G Bb G Bb G Bb, G Eb Bb A, G Eb Bb A, Bb G Eb F Bb G Eb F Bb. Repeat
8 Mar 2010
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2:27
Don Ward, Autolite Motorsports Engineer, explains the difference between a copper plug and an iridium enhanced platinum plug. For more info, go to www.autolite****
29 Jul 2008
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0:39
If you are a racer or an auto enhusiast… Learn how to read an spark plug from a pro, Don Ward, Motorsports Engineer for Autolite. For more info, go to www.autolite****
29 Jul 2008
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2:05
Here I use a warded padlock pick to bypass the wards and open the lock. I also explain how a pick for these locks can be made.
2 Aug 2008
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1:57
The Clara Ward Singers' Madeline Thompson and Sandy Mack visit with Mario at the 1st Annual Gospel Concert sponsored by the View Park section of the National Council of Negro Women. More info at Pax Stereo Tv (www.paxstereo.tv).
17 Sep 2008
514
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6:23
The Clara Ward Singers' Madeline Thompson and Sandy Mack visit with Mario at the 1st Annual Gospel Concert sponsored by the View Park section of the National Council of Negro Women. More info at Pax Stereo Tv (www.paxstereo.tv).
17 Sep 2008
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2:59
A rendition of "Wake Up", a song by "Cold Duck Complex", performed by Brad at a Benefit Concert for The Lower 9th Ward Village. *******www.lower9thwardvillage****
13 Nov 2008
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10:54
Turner takes us on a tour of the fledgling home school he is creating in the former Blair Grocery in New Orlean's lower 9th ward. It was the only grocery store in the area and the 1st black owned business in the lower 9th ward. *******ShoolAtBlairGrocery.blogspot****
9 Feb 2009
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1:59
WASHINGTON — A blue-ribbon panel of scientists is trying to determine the best way to detect and ward off any wandering space rocks that might be on a collision course with Earth. ``We're looking for the killer asteroid,'' James Heasley , of the University of Hawaii's Institute for Astronomy , last week told the committee that the National Academy of Sciences created at Congress' request. Congress asked the academy to conduct the study after astronomers were unable to eliminate an extremely slight chance that an asteroid called Apophis will slam into Earth with devastating effect in 2036. Apophis was discovered in 2004 about 17 million miles from Earth on a course that would overlap our planet's orbit in 2029 and return seven years later. Observers said that the asteroid — a massive boulder left over from the birth of the solar system — is about 1,000 feet wide and weighs at least 50 million tons. After further observations, astronomers reported that the asteroid would skim by Earth harmlessly in 2029, but it has a one in 44,000 probability of slamming into our planet on Easter Sunday , April 13, 2036 . Small changes in Apophis' path that could make the difference between a hit or a miss are possible, according to Jon Giorgini , a planetary analyst in NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. ``We have not eliminated the threat in 2036,'' Lindley Johnson , the manager of NASA's asteroid detection program, told the committee. The academy panel is headed by Irwin Shapiro , a former director of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass. It has a two-part assignment from Congress : Detect and deflect asteroids that might hit earth. First, the Shapiro committee is supposed to propose the best way to detect and analyze 90 percent of the so-called ``near Earth objects'' orbiting between Mars and Venus that are wider than 460 feet by 2020. About 20 percent of these are identified as potentially hazardous objects because they might pass within 5 million miles of Earth (20 times the distance to the Moon). More than 5,000 near Earth objects, including 789 potentially hazardous objects, have been identified so far. Johnson predicted that future surveys will find at least 66,000 near Earth objects and 18,000 potentially hazardous objects. A collision with one or more of these many objects littering the solar system is inevitable, Johnson said. ``Once every hundred years there might be something to worry about, but it could happen tomorrow.'' For example, astronomers had only 24 hours' notice of a small asteroid that blew up over northern Africa on Oct. 7 . A larger, more dangerous object presumably would be spotted years or decades ahead, giving humans time to change its course before it hit. The Shapiro panel's second task is to review various methods that have been proposed to deflect or destroy an incoming asteroid and recommend the best options. They include a nuclear bomb, conventional explosives or a spacecraft that would push or pull the asteroid off its course. Offbeat ideas are painting the surface of the asteroid so that the sun's rays would heat it differently and alter its direction, and a ``gravity tractor, ''a satellite that would fly close to the asteroid, gently nudging it aside. The earlier that a dangerous asteroid is found, and the farther it is from Earth, the easier it will be to change its trajectory, panel members were told. A relatively small force would be enough while the object is millions of miles away. The year 2029 could be crucial. When Apophis makes its first pass by Earth, its track can be more precisely determined. That will enable astronomers to judge whether Earth will escape with a near miss or will have to take swift action to avoid a blow that could devastate a region as large as Europe or the Eastern United States . To deflect an asteroid, scientists need to know its shape, weight and composition. A ball of loose rubble would be handled differently from a solid metallic rock. ``Finding them is one thing, but you have to know your enemy,'' said James Green , the director of NASA's Planetary Science Division. So far, NASA has spent $41 million on asteroid detection and deflection, but the Near Earth Object Program is running out of money. ``It's just barely hanging on,'' Shapiro said. Two expensive telescopes to focus on dangerous asteroids have been proposed, but Congress and the incoming Obama administration must be persuaded to approve the money. ``Without new telescopes, we'd never get to 90 percent (detection),'' Johnson said. After a lot of original skepticism, Congress now looks favorably on the asteroid project, according to Richard Obermann , the staff director of the House Subcommittee on Space and Aeronautics. ``There used to be a high giggle factor among members,'' Obermann said. ``But it's now a very respectable area of investigation.'' Johnson told the Shapiro committee that the search for killer asteroids must have a high priority. ``The space program could provide humanity few greater legacies than to know the time and place of any cosmic destruction to allow ample time to prepare our response to that inevitable event,'' he said. ON THE WEB NASA's Near Earth Object Program Near Earth Environment animation 2007-08 MORE FROM MCCLATCHY Evidence found of solar system around nearby star Arctic temperatures hit record high Will new Mars lander be parked or scrapped?
19 Dec 2008
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