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0:08
Human Mobile Stage No.18 - Hong Kong Chinese Wushu Group Tournament was held by China Sportsman (Hong Kong) Union to be celebrated for 10 Years of Hong Kong was handover to China. Time: 2007-5-30 to 2007-6-1. Venue: The Queen Elizabeth Stadium. Hong Kong Island. The Competitors: from China, Taiwan, Macau and Hong Kong. (Chung Oi Chau Chung Martial Art Sports Association) This video competitors: Kwok Chun(Short Guy 04104) and Choi Siu Kwan (Tall Guy 04103), Double edge Poles (wooden staffs); Golden Medal,
22 Jun 2007
2445
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0:21
Human Mobile Stage No.19 - Hong Kong Chinese Wushu Group Tournament was held by China Sportsman (Hong Kong) Union to be celebrated for 10 Years of Hong Kong was handover to China. Time: 2007-5-30 to 2007-6-1. Venue: The Queen Elizabeth Stadium. Hong Kong Island. The Competitors: from China, Taiwan, Macau and Hong Kong. (Chung Oi Chau Chung Martial Art Sports Association) This video competitor: Chow Wing Ha, weapon - Kick (=Spear with sharpen edge in the middle); Silver Medal. Other Chau Ka Kung Fu details please refer to Human Mobile Stage Part 1 (Descriptions and comments), length: 5:55.
22 Jun 2007
1367
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0:18
Human Mobile Stage No.20 - Hong Kong Chinese Wushu Group Tournament was held by China Sportsman (Hong Kong) Union to be celebrated for 10 Years of Hong Kong was handover to China. Time: 2007-5-30 to 2007-6-1. Venue: The Queen Elizabeth Stadium. Hong Kong Island. The Competitors: from China, Taiwan, Macau and Hong Kong. (Chung Oi Chau Chung Martial Art Sports Association) This video competitor: Cheng Chi Yip; Silver Medal. Other Chau Ka Kung Fu details please refer to Human Mobile Stage Part 1 (Descriptions and comments), length: 5:55.
22 Jun 2007
926
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0:15
Human Mobile Stage No.21- Hong Kong Chinese Wushu Group Tournament was held by China Sportsman (Hong Kong) Union to be celebrated for 10 Years of Hong Kong was handover to China. Time: 2007-5-30 to 2007-6-1. Venue: The Queen Elizabeth Stadium. Hong Kong Island. The Competitors: from China, Taiwan, Macau and Hong Kong. (Chung Oi Chau Chung Martial Art Sports Association) This video competitor: Lau Kim Yick; Bronze Medal, Other Chau Ka Kung Fu details please refer to Human Mobile Stage Part 1 (Descriptions and comments), length: 5:55.
22 Jun 2007
820
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0:10
Human Mobile Stage No.22- Hong Kong Chinese Wushu Group Tournament was held by China Sportsman (Hong Kong) Union to be celebrated for 10 Years of Hong Kong was handover to China. Time: 2007-5-30 to 2007-6-1. Venue: The Queen Elizabeth Stadium. Hong Kong Island. The Competitors: from China, Taiwan, Macau and Hong Kong. (Chung Oi Chau Chung Martial Art Sports Association) This video competitor: Wong Chun Kit; Bronze Medal. Other Chau Ka Kung Fu details please refer to Human Mobile Stage Part 1 (Descriptions and comments), length: 5:55.
22 Jun 2007
853
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0:39
Hong Kong Chinese Wushu Group Tournament. (Chung Oi Chau Chung Martial Art Sports Association Competitors) Group Competition: Silver Cup: Chow Wing Hao (Fist), Lau Kim Yick - Single Chopper, Du Joe Kuen ( Spear) and Kwan Wing Lung (Double Choppers);Spear Vs Double Chopper, Chan Kan Keung - Double Chopper, Sek Ka Kit - Spear, Kwok Chun (Short Guy) and Choi Siu Kwan (Tall Guy) - Double Edge Pole Vs Double Edge Pole. Other Chau Ka Kung Fu details please refer to Human Mobile Stage Part 1 (Descriptions and comments), length: 5:55.
22 Jun 2007
2184
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0:55
Oldschool Wushu fight. these guys have crazy skills.
2 Aug 2007
100980
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1:10
Wushu Champion Xu Xiang Dong performing one of the best Eagle claw sets I've ever seen! Eagle Claw(Ying Zaho Quan) is a Northern Shaolin style that emphasizes the use of Chin-na (locking) techniques. The hand in the shape of the claw is used to apply pressure to an opponent's joints, veins, and pressure points, thus controlling and immobilizing him. Eagle Claw is ideal for both men and women of any size because great body strength is not required to be effective in a defensive situation. Using various hand strengthening exercises the claw is developed to have a vice-like grip and a burning sensation as if hot coals were being pressed into the opponent. Eagle Claw strength is based on finger power, finger joint power, and wrist power. Without all three the claw is ineffective. A well developed claw can control an opponent without injury, causing damage only when unavoidable. In this way Eagle Claw is a highly moral system that provides very effective self-defense without unnecessary injury to an opponent. At the core of all Eagle Claw techniques are the principles of yin and yang. Punches and palm strikes are executed relaxed, but firm, until the end when the hand and the arm are hardened. This gives the technique a snapping action that adds power without a great need for strength. Movements are fast then slow, yielding then advancing, depending on the need of the situation and the technique to be employed. The student learns to at once be strong as a mountain, and then as yielding as a blade of grass in the wind. The Eagle Claw system includes: 25 fist forms over 25 weapon forms over 25 partner forms and the 108 locking techniques. Forms must be practiced diligently until the movements and techniques are perfected. It's in the forms that the student unlocks the secrets of Eagle Claw. Every step and hand technique in the forms have a self-defense application. Practicing the forms also develops discipline and focus in the student, advantages that become invaluable in everyday life. Three of the forms are considered Master forms and contain the most intricate techniques of the Eagle Claw system. These forms are: Lin Kuen (Connected Fist) Jui Lao Tong (Eagle Claw Drunken Set) Fuk Fu Kuen (Control the Tiger) The Northern Eagle Claw system is ideal for both men and women of various age groups, body types, and athletic ability. Because the system relies upon subtle re-direction of an attacker's own aggressive energy, it can be used effectively regardless of the practitioner's size or strength. The cornerstone of Northern Eagle Claw kung fu is the set of "108 fighting techniques" adapted by General Ngok Fei from a Shaolin monk named Jow Tong. These techniques make effective use of the hand fashioned as a grasping eagle's claw (Ying Jow) to deliver devastating locks and traps (often referred to broadly as "chin na" or grappling techniques). During the time of the Ming Dynasty, a monk named Lai Chin incorporated General Ngok Fei's fighting techniques with elements of the Faan Tzi system. Faan Tzi techniques are based upon swift, open and often acrobatic movements designed to out-maneuver and dominate an opponent. The combination of Ying Jow (eagle claw) with Faan Tzi techniques yielded the system known today as Northern Eagle Claw kung fu (Ying Jow Faan Tzi Pai).
16 Apr 2008
6494
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2:56
Demonstarted by Wushu Champion Wang Hongling. For complete step-by-step intructional VCD and more items visit www.kungfudirect**** supplying all of your wushu needs.
24 Feb 2008
3485
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0:50
wushu praying mantis boxing. enjoy Coaching * Workshop * Show * Training ...for more information about david trk and the berlin wushu team please visit the following sites: www.david-toeroek.de www.berlin-wushu-team**** www.myspace****/davidtoeroek www.myspace****/wushuteamberlin Wang Lang (the style creator) was born in the Tsi Mo district, in Shantung Province. He lived during the Ming Dynasty fall and as he was a patriot (some Masters say he was uncle of the last Ming Emperor), he decided to excel in the martial arts to fight against the Ching Dynasty (Manchurian rulers). He entered to the Shaolin monastery in Sung Shang, but being prosecuted by the Manchurians he travelled all over China, training in places places where he could find Kung Fu Masters. In this way he learned 17 Chinese Boxing styles. After this travel, Wang Lang entered to the Lao Shan monastery. Once there, he was always defeated by the abbot of the temple in spite of his deep knowledge of the fighting arts. One day, while he was meditating in a forest he saw a combat between a praying mantis and a cicada. He was impressed by the aggressive attitude of the mantis and he started studying its movements. After a long learning time he combined the praying mantis hand movements with the monkey steps (to enhance the coordination between hand and feet). With this new style Wang Lang could defeat the monastery abbot. Wang Lang went on modifying his system and when he felt satisfied with his creation he accepted some disciples.
6 Aug 2008
4158
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1:09
Ditang (ground boxing) from the "Chinese Wushu" documentary
31 Jan 2008
497
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1:16
Hou Quan Wushu Routine The earliest version of Houquan was first recorded in the time of the Han Dynasty (206 BCE-220 CE) when it was performed at the Imperial court. Later on, several other martial arts, which no longer exist independently, were incorporated into Houquan. There are many legends concerning famous Kung Fu masters observing monkeys in the wild and emulating their quick movements.
9 Jul 2008
1240
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